How To Do Your Own Soil Test

Knowing what kind of soil you have in your garden can mean the difference between a sparse lawn and a blooming garden. You are going to love these clever tips and tricks.

If your goal this year is a lush green lawn or a yard full of blooms and veggies, then you’re going to want to try this test that will  identify your soil type.

Using only a jar and some water, you can easily see whether the earth around your home is mainly clay, sand or silt.

How To Identify Soil Type Video Tutorial

We are sharing this 2 minute video from Urban Self Sufficiency that shows you the best way to identify your soil type and using a jar.

The better the soil, the better the results. First, you need to know what you are sitting on. After you have viewed the video, be sure to continue scrolling for all the infographics that we have included for you. Click Play above now ^

How To Identify & Improve Your Garden Soil

The easiest way to identify the soil type in your garden is with the jar test that was demonstrated in the featured video. You’ll just need a clean jar with a tight-fitting lid. You will then half-fill with soil from your garden and half with water.

The idea is to learn the nutrients your garden is lacking. You can then address these deficiencies by using the proper fertilizer.

In the graphic above from Gardeners Edge, they show an example of what your test may look like. The middle jar shows the soil at 30% clay, 40% silt. 30% is the ideal mix of soil for most plants.

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This chart from Schultz shows how to improve different types of garden soil mixes using different mediums. Compost, Peat Moss, Sand, and Manure are common fertilizers.

Keep in mind that you’ll need to plan your planting and a companion planting guide is an excellent reference particularly if you are planting veggies.

Some plants may need moist soil and little drainage and others may need a rockier soil with good drainage. By knowing what soil you’re working with and the environments that the plants require, you can plant your garden in sections and fertilize them perfectly.

When it comes to nature, nothing is better than going natural. If you know exactly what your soil needs, a few scraps from your kitchen can be extremely beneficial.

This chart from Fresh Eggs Daily has some great suggestions. Banana Peels add Potassium, Chicken Feathers add Nitrogen as do Coffee Grounds and crushed eggshells add calcium. Epsom Salt is excellent for Magnesium and Lobster Shells add Phosphorus and Wood Ash Neutralizes your soil. Be sure to check out our popular Natural Fertilizers Post too.

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